Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

2 seats to open up on education board

State Capitol Bureau BISMARCK - The nominating committee for the state Board of Higher Education is seeking applicants for two seats on the board that open up next year. The board governs the North Dakota University System. Come July 1, the terms...

State Capitol Bureau

BISMARCK - The nominating committee for the state Board of Higher Education is seeking applicants for two seats on the board that open up next year.

The board governs the North Dakota University System.

Come July 1, the terms of board members Richie Smith of Wahpeton and Pam Kostelecky of Dickinson expire.

Smith is eligible for reappointment to a second four-year term. Kostelecky, who has been on the board since 2002, is not.

ADVERTISEMENT

Smith could not be reached immediately for comment Wednesday on whether he plans to apply for a second term.

The deadline to apply is noon on Dec. 24.

The nominating committee will meet Jan. 13 at the Supreme Court to discuss the applications and forward three finalists for each position to the governor, who makes the appointment. Appointees must then be confirmed by the state Senate.

Anyone interested can get an application by calling (701) 328-4572 or writing the Department of Public Instruction, 600 E. Boulevard Ave., Bismarck, 58505-0440. Applicants also need to submit a background resume and supporting references when they send the completed application.

Cole works for Forum Communications Co., which owns The Forum. She can be reached at (701) 224-0830 or forumcap@btinet.net

What To Read Next
A Sanford doctor says moderate cold exposure could be the boost people need for their day.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Columnist Carol Bradley Bursack explains the differences between Alzheimer's, dementia and other common forms of dementia.
While the United States government gave help to businesses and people, a lack of assistance has left some Chinese citizens angry and destitute.