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Actress Woodley urges boycott of Dakota Access pipeline banks on 'Late Show with Stephen Colbert'

NEW YORK -- Actress Shailene Woodley, arrested in October at a Dakota Access Pipeline protest near Cannon Ball, N.D., told a national talk show Monday night that people everwhere can protest the pipeline by boycotting banks that fund it.Woodley w...

Shailene Woodley
Shailene Woodley's arrest photo from an October Dakota Access pipeline protest in Morton County, North Dakota.
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NEW YORK -- Actress Shailene Woodley, arrested in October at a Dakota Access Pipeline protest near Cannon Ball, N.D., told a national talk show Monday night that people everywhere can protest the pipeline by boycotting banks that fund it .

Woodley was the first guest Monday night on "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert."

Colbert asked Woodley about her involvement in the protest and showed her jail booking photo to the national audience. He asked if she'd be returning to the site anytime soon.

Woodley said that while people were still protesting the pipeline in North Dakota, she said a website will soon be publicized that enables people who disagree with the pipeline to stop supporting banks that fund it. She suggested that might be the best way to stop it after the Trump Administration paved the way in recent weeks for work to resume on the multi-state pipeline that's nearly complete but for a crossing of the Missouri River in central North Dakota, where protesters have been camped for more than half a year.

Woodley is a TV and film actress whose latest project, "Big Little Lies," has her starring alongside Reese Witherspoon and Nicole Kidman in the HBO miniseries.

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