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Backer of Paul still on the Ron

Sometimes the people making the news can be as interesting as, or more interesting than, the news they are making. Occasionally, I'll spend face time with these folks, one on one, away from the office and out in public. Since food is a great equa...

Sometimes the people making the news can be as interesting as, or more interesting than, the news they are making.

Occasionally, I'll spend face time with these folks, one on one, away from the office and out in public. Since food is a great equalizer, this little dish session will be called "Power Lunch" and will appear occasionally.

If you thought you'd heard the last from Republican presidential hopeful Ron Paul, think again. The U.S. representative from Texas has failed to win any state primary and only picked up a handful of presidential delegates. Still, North Dakota supporters were buoyed after Super Tuesday, when he came in third behind Mitt Romney and only 140 votes behind John McCain statewide. Overall, Paul received five delegates in North Dakota and nine in Minnesota.

"From a North Dakota perspective, I'm very pleased," said state campaign coordinator Charlene Nelson.

Sitting over a Presidents Day lunch of an Italian Beef sandwich at Fargo's Bertrosa's on Broadway, she said Paul backers aim to be a presence at the North Dakota Republican Convention next month in Fargo. Her Feb. 13 posting to the campaign's Web site, www.ronpaul2008.com , urges allies to become delegates: "The revolution lives on and it starts with you."

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"The vote on (Super) Tuesday wasn't for Romney as much as it was a vote against McCain. North Dakotans traditionally don't like his liberal positions, so that's one of the biggest reasons for a strong Romney showing."

With Romney out, she's looking to gather more support for Paul instead of McCain.

A Casselton, N.D., housewife who home-schools her three sons, Nelson plans to attend the September GOP National Convention in St. Paul, hoping to do so as a North Dakota delegate. It's the first time in 20 years she's supported a GOP presidential candidate.

While her husband, Ross, a regular contributor to The Forum's opinion page, supported Paul's first bid in 1988, Charlene voted for the George H. W. Bush. A year later, she felt the president betrayed his campaign promises and vowed to vote her conscience, "not the lesser of two evils."

So how would President Paul, who feels the federal government oversteps its bounds, observe the federally observed Presidents Day?

"I think he'd honor it the way the founding fathers did."

Actually, it wasn't celebrated until the 1880s.

"Well, right. He would honor the spirit of the founding fathers who recognized there's a legitimate role for the federal government not overstepping its boundaries. Jefferson said a little revolution now and then is not a bad thing."

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And revolutionaries need not be militants, only politically active people.

"I'm a housewife. I'm not a political professional by any means. The most important thing I do is get dinner on the table for my family," she said. "Don't leave this to professionals, don't leave it to policymakers. Make your voice heard."

Readers can reach Forum columnist John Lamb at (701) 241-5533.

Lamb's blog can be found at www.areavoices.com/johnlamb

For 20 years John Lamb has covered art, entertainment and lifestyle stories in the area for The Forum.
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