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Big Iron attendance declines

WEST FARGO - The attendance at this year's 34th annual Big Iron Farm Show was down. Red River Valley Fairgrounds officials estimated attendance at 64,000, which is down from 87,000 in 2013. Although the numbers were down, exhibitors and attendees...

WEST FARGO – The attendance at this year’s 34th annual Big Iron Farm Show was down.

Red River Valley Fairgrounds officials estimated attendance at 64,000, which is down from 87,000 in 2013.

Although the numbers were down, exhibitors and attendees were pleased with the quality of the leads they were generating, Red River Valley Fair Assistant Manager Jodi Buresh said in a news release.

“The rain and cold did bring down the attendance numbers for this year’s show” said General Manager Bryan Schulz. “The people at the show were the ones that were seriously looking for new ideas, new products and were interacting with the exhibitors.”

Nancy Johnson, executive director of the North Dakota Soybean Growers Association, said the show gave her organization a chance to meet with other similar groups.

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“We are always happy to be a part of Big Iron because we see other soybean growers from across the state that we don’t normally get to see at other events,” she said. “It’s a great event to meet and talk with the producers.”

Mustang Seeds District Sales Manager Mark Brownlee had an outdoor booth at the show. He said attendance Tuesday was disappointing, blaming the cold weather. By Wednesday, Mustang Seeds provided a heater in its tent that drew people in.

Despite the low numbers, Emily Grunewald, exhibit coordinator, expects to have another sold-out show for the 35th Annual Big Iron Farm Show.

Exhibitors have an automatic renewal deadline for next year’s show of Dec. 1. There is already a waiting list. Show dates are Sept. 15-17.

 

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