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CableOne guarantees no rate increase until 2006

Talk about this story The Fargo-Moorhead area's cable TV provider announced this week it will lock in until 2006 its rates for two of its cable packages. The guarantee from CableOne, with 42,000 area customers, applies to Lifeline and Digital Lif...

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The Fargo-Moorhead area's cable TV provider announced this week it will lock in until 2006 its rates for two of its cable packages.

The guarantee from CableOne, with 42,000 area customers, applies to Lifeline and Digital Lifeline services.

Lifeline service, featuring local broadcast networks, both C-Span channels, QVC and PBS, is $17.95 a month.

Digital Lifeline service, featuring local broadcast networks, 40 music channels, pay-per-view access and 22 digital networks such as Court TV, ESPN News, Fox Sports World, Biography, Toon Disney and the Hallmark Channel, is $27.95 a month.

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"We've listened to those who've requested fewer cable channels at lower costs, and have designed our Lifeline services with those needs in mind," CableOne General Manager Scott Geston said in a news release.

CableOne recently said it would raise its 2004 rates by $2 for customers in Fargo, Moorhead and West Fargo just as area satellite TV providers said they would begin offering local networks in April using a newly launched satellite.

The change is expected to create increased competition for subscribers.

CableOne, owned by The Washington Post Co., last raised its area basic rates in 2002. It operates 52 cable systems serving 762,000 subscribers in 19 states.

Earlier this month, Geston said the 2002 rate increase was because of cable networks increasing their charges to cable providers.

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