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Car fire causes $40k in damage at downtown Fargo apartment building

FARGO - A fire in a garage that started when a car there caught on fire is estimated to have caused about $40,000 in damages, fire officials said Thursday.

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FARGO – A fire in a garage that started when a car there caught on fire is estimated to have caused about $40,000 in damages, fire officials said Thursday.

Fargo Fire Battalion Chief Dane Carley said firefighters responded at about 1:55 Thursday morning to a report of a fire alarm at 1 2nd St. S., although people who live there said they didn’t see or smell any smoke initially.

By the time fire crews arrived, they could see light haze coming from the east side of the building and smell the building burning.

Inside, firefighters found a car on fire in a large garage attached to the apartment building.

Crews had the fire under control in less than 15 minutes, and a sprinkler system that activated limited the damage mostly to the one vehicle, sparing cars parked on either side.

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A person at the scene had soot stains on his face, but refused medical treatment.

Losses are estimated at about $30,000 for the vehicle and $10,000 for the garage roof.

This is the fourth fire this year in which a sprinkler system has helped limit losses from a fire in the city, Carley said. 

Related Topics: FIRES
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