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Clay County neighbors of Bloomington dentist Walter Palmer say they have had issues with him

Tansem Township, Minn. - The world seems to be looking for Walter Palmer, including U.S. officials. Palmer is the Twin Cities dentist who recently admitted to killing a prized lion named Cecil in Zimbabwe. Hunting guides allegedly lured the anima...

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Tansem Township, Minn. - The world seems to be looking for Walter Palmer, including U.S. officials.

Palmer is the Twin Cities dentist who recently admitted to killing a prized lion named Cecil in Zimbabwe. Hunting guides allegedly lured the animal off protected land.

Now, the group is facing criminal poaching charges. On Monday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said it couldn't find Palmer and is hoping to question him about the incident. Zimbabwe Republic Police are also looking for him.

In a statement to his patients, the dentist wrote he was relying on his local guides to ensure a legal hunt. Palmer appears to have gone into hiding since then.

Palmer's love of hunting often brings him to our region. The North Dakota native owns property just 45 minutes outside of Fargo-Moorhead.

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WDAY-TV reporter Catherine Ross traveled to rural Clay County. She didn't find the dentist, but she did find some of his unhappy neighbors.

Walter Palmer owns more than 500 acres in Southeast Clay County. He purchased the land in 2001. His neighbors say immediately the Twin Cities dentist pounded in stakes and disputed property lines.

None of Palmer's neighbors want their identities known. They say the dentist doesn't get along with those bordering his land. Now, many are concerned a torrent of public outrage could make its way here to a sleepy Tansem Township.

The avid sportsman is under fire for luring a beloved lion named Cecil out of a sanctuary in Zimbabwe and shooting it with a crossbow. Various global outlets report Palmer paid more than $50,000 to safari guides for the hunt.

Now, he's paying in the court of public opinion. This week, protesters surrounded his shuttered practice, River Bluff Dental in Bloomington, and labelled the dentist a killer.

It's a quieter scene three-and-a-half hours north, but the tight-knit community is at odds with Palmer, too. Neighbors say he equipped his vast acreage with surveillance cameras and is quick to call the authorities if anyone steps onto his property. Those who've been inside his home say it's full of exotic and local head trophies.

Some question his deer hunting tactics as well. Multiple people say he pays for someone to drive up and down this gravel road herding the animals back onto his land.

Neighbors say they haven't seen any sign of Palmer lately. When I approached the house, a landscaper told me to leave the private property.

Related Topics: CLAY COUNTY
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