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Colorado man convicted of repeatedly kidnapping toddler, making child porn

DENVER - A Colorado man was convicted by a federal jury on Friday of repeatedly kidnapping a toddler from a couple he was staying with in California and producing child pornography which he shared online, prosecutors said.

DENVER - A Colorado man was convicted by a federal jury on Friday of repeatedly kidnapping a toddler from a couple he was staying with in California and producing child pornography which he shared online, prosecutors said.

Shawn McCormack, 31, of Colorado Springs was found guilty after a four-day trial of four counts of sexual exploitation of a child and two counts of kidnapping, the U.S. Department of Justice said in a statement.

The court heard how McCormack, pretending to be the couple's friend, stayed with them as an overnight guest in Bakersfield on multiple occasions, the statement said.

Several times, it said, he snuck their toddler out of the home in the middle of the night and recorded himself sexually abusing the child in a nearby motel, outdoors, and in his truck.

"McCormack then returned the toddler to the house before the parents awoke," the statement said.

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"The evidence demonstrated that McCormack distributed the images and videos of his abuse to others online, including an undercover officer with the Toronto Police Services."

He was tracked down after federal agents were able to establish where one of the videos was filmed and when, it said. They then learned McCormack paid for the hotel room that night.

Details on the couple were not given by prosecutors, but the statement said agents also uncovered evidence that McCormack had recorded himself abusing their second child but gave no further detail.

A sentencing hearing is set for July 27.

Related Topics: CRIME
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