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Corps provides details on flood study meetings

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will host two public meetings this month to seek the public's input for a feasibility study as well as disclose results of an initial screening of flood protection alternatives.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will host two public meetings this month to seek the public's input for a feasibility study as well as disclose results of an initial screening of flood protection alternatives.

The meetings will take place from 6-9 p.m. Oct. 20 and 21.

Both Fargo Mayor Dennis Walaker and Moorhead Mayor Mark Voxland will be there as well as at a meeting Oct. 19 with other state and national leaders.

Walaker said North Dakota Gov. John Hoeven, Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty and North Dakota U.S. Sen. Byron Dorgan will be in attendance at the official meeting.

"It's very important," Walaker said. "It's a beginning step."

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The first public meeting Oct. 20 will take place at the townhouse room at the Howard Johnson Inn on Third Avenue North in Fargo.

The second public meeting Oct. 21 will take place at Hagen Hall/Science Lab Complex Auditorium 104 at Minnesota State University-Moorhead.

Voxland said he'll also be at the MSUM meeting.

"I want to hear what people have to say," he said. "I have no idea what the corps will propose."

The feasibility study, which began in September 2008, focuses on reducing flood risk in the Fargo-Moorhead area. It's estimated to cost $6.4 million and will take two and a half years to complete.

Walaker said officials expect to hear about 16 options from the corps at this month's meetings. Those options will be whittled down to four or five by January and one preferred option by December 2010 at the latest.

"Everything right now is on track," he said.

Related Topics: MOORHEAD
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