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Council members authorize insurance payment

MAYVILLE, N.D. -- Mayor Jim LeClair is off the hook for a payment he authorized to a former police officer without City Council approval. The Mayville City Council voted 4-2 Wednesday to authorize the city's insurance provider to reimburse Mayvil...

MAYVILLE, N.D. -- Mayor Jim LeClair is off the hook for a payment he authorized to a former police officer without City Council approval.

The Mayville City Council voted 4-2 Wednesday to authorize the city's insurance provider to reimburse Mayville $3,800. If the vote had gone the other way, LeClair and former police officer Matt Lindemeier would have had to repay the city.

The council was spilt 3-3 on the same issue on Dec. 15. LeClair cast the tie-breaking vote, which the state attorney general later ruled was inappropriate.

When the council reconsidered the issue Wednesday, council member Cheryl Angen changed her vote to approve the motion.

"I'm still not saying I agree with his actions," Angen said after the meeting. "But we just have to move on."

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City attorney Bill Brudvik advised the council members that the city could end up paying more money in legal fees to get the $3,800 from LeClair and Lindemeier.

Councilman Mike Worner said the payment was a mistake LeClair made when he was new in office.

"We have insurance policies to cover mistakes. This is a mistake," Worner said.

Councilmen Rick Forsgren and Rick Nepstad also voted to authorize the payment.

Members Neil Dornacker and Larry Young opposed the motion, which they also did Dec. 15.

Former council member Rob Lauf, in attendance at the meeting, made statements against the motion.

"Two wrongs don't make a right," Lauf said. "It boils down to accountability. It boils down to respect of the office."

Readers can reach Forum reporter Amy Dalrymple at (701) 241-5590

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