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Dewey fondly remembered

Neighbors has carried several letters about the late WDAY weatherman Dewey Bergquist and the rain gauge bearing his name. But the mail about him and the gauge continue to pour in like, well, the rain.

Neighbors has carried several letters about the late WDAY weatherman Dewey Bergquist and the rain gauge bearing his name. But the mail about him and the gauge continue to pour in like, well, the rain.

Sandy Morrow, Frazee, Minn., writes, "We had a Dewey rain gauge when the first were being sold.

"It finally cracked and leaked and we taped and taped until a new one was advertised over Channel 11 by Tom Szymanski (who no longer is with that station)."

"I have one, my daughter has one and my grandson has one," Sandy says. "We live 10 miles apart and what a comparison we share after rain or a snowfall."

Meanwhile, Ron Fredrickson, Roseville, Calif., formerly of Fargo, remembers a radio program titled "Dewey's Follies." He wonders if that Dewey would have been Dewey Bergquist.

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Sure was. And the proof comes from Steve Tschida, production director for WDAY Radio and who is something of that station's resident historian, who forwarded a 1974 story about Dewey in Howard Binford's F-M Guide magazine.

Dewey, a Moorhead native, first was with KVOX Radio, Moorhead, where he had his nightly "Dewey's Follies" show. He moved to WDAY in 1954, where he became "Dirty Dewey, your cowboy companion," and claimed he had a horse named Brutus complete with a light and telephone on his saddle.

He became WDAY-TV's weatherman in 1957. One of his popular features was displaying strangely shaped vegetables viewers sent in. Also, he graded the weather. "A" meant a beautiful day coming up. But you wouldn't want to go outside if he graded the weather an "F."

His cohorts on the nightly newscasts at WDAY were Marv Bossart and Boyd Christenson. "We consider each other pretty great," Dewey told Binford; "We understand each other."

It would take someone like Marv or Boyd to understand a guy who allegedly had a horse equipped with a light and telephone.

If you have an item of interest for this column, mail it to Neighbors, The Forum, Box 2020, Fargo, N.D. 58107; fax it to 241-5487; or e-mail blind@forumcomm.com

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