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Dickinson man fires flare gun after his dog is barred from bar

A 58-year-old man accused of bringing a loaded gun to a Fargo bar in July has been arrested for firing a flare gun inside a Dickinson, N.D., bar after his dog was not allowed to enter.

Charles Howington

A 58-year-old man accused of bringing a loaded gun to a Fargo bar in July has been arrested for firing a flare gun inside a Dickinson, N.D., bar after his dog was not allowed to enter.

Charles Howington is accused of pointing the flare gun at patrons and firing it at Army's West Sports Bar on Tuesday after he was told he could not bring his dog into the bar, according to police Investigator Chris Coates.

Howington, who was convicted in 2005 of bringing a concealed and loaded .38-caliber handgun into a different Dickinson bar, was arrested at a nearby motel, Coates said.

In June, Fargo police responded to Big D's Grill & Bar after patrons spotted a loaded .22-caliber revolver in Howington's waistband. Bar em-ployees told police Howington, who had a dog with him at the time, had been causing problems and had walked out on his bill the previous night, Cass County District Court documents state.

Police searching Howington and the motorized wheelchair he was in also found an orange flare gun, a wooden mail opener and several boxes of ammunition. He told police he brought the gun for protection and that it was loaded.

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In addition to the 2005 Dickinson bar incident, Howington was convicted of felony terrorizing and reckless endangerment for a May 2005 argument with a man in his apartment. He threatened to shoot the man in the leg or foot and fired a gun at least three times in the direction of the man's feet, according to Stark County District Court records.

Howington faces three felony charges and a misdemeanor for the latest incident. He is scheduled to change his plea to charges stemming from the Fargo incident on Dec. 8.

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