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DNA rules out rape charge

DNA analysis has prompted the Clay County Attorney's Office to dismiss sexual assault charges against a Glyndon, Minn., man. Alberto Aurelio Betancourt Jr., 19, was charged in Clay County District Court in September with one count of kidnapping, ...

DNA analysis has prompted the Clay County Attorney's Office to dismiss sexual assault charges against a Glyndon, Minn., man.

Alberto Aurelio Betancourt Jr., 19, was charged in Clay County District Court in September with one count of kidnapping, one count of first-degree criminal sexual conduct and one count of second-degree criminal sexual conduct.

A 12-year-old girl told police Betancourt grabbed her, kissed her and touched her over her clothing when she was at a friend's house in Glyndon, where she went to listen to music and dance, court documents said.

Police talked to friends of the girl who said the 12-year-old told them she had been raped.

The girl told the same thing to a nurse, the court documents said.

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Betancourt's attorney, Richard Varriano, said DNA from seminal fluid found on the girl's underwear did not match Betancourt's DNA.

Clay County Attorney Brian Melton said the DNA question combined with the girl's inability to explain it raised reasonable doubt as to guilt and left prosecutors unable to proceed with the case.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Dave Olson at (701) 241-5555

DNA rules out rape charge Dave Olson 20071215

I'm a reporter and a photographer and sometimes I create videos to go with my stories.

I graduated from Minnesota State University Moorhead and in my time with The Forum I have covered a number of beats, from cops and courts to business and education.

I've also written about UFOs, ghosts, dinosaur bones and the planet Pluto.

You may reach me by phone at 701-241-5555, or by email at dolson@forumcomm.com
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