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Drowning death near Red River ruled a suicide

A 78-year-old Fargo man whose body was found along the Red River more than six weeks after he went missing died as a result of self-inflicted drowning, according to an autopsy report.

A 78-year-old Fargo man whose body was found along the Red River more than six weeks after he went missing died as a result of self-inflicted drowning, according to an autopsy report.

The body of Tony Sang Nguyen was found May 16 by two fishermen along the Red River near El Zagal Golf Course in north Fargo. He was last seen March 25, when his vehicle was found abandoned on the Main Avenue Bridge.

The state forensic examiner's report listed the manner of death as suicide and the cause of death as drowning due to submersion in an outdoor body of water, Fargo police Sgt. Ross Renner said Thursday.

Police had said that they didn't suspect a crime or an accident in Nguyen's disappearance.

When Nguyen's vehicle was found abandoned on the bridge, some of his personal effects were found in the area on the shore of the Red River, police said. Divers recovered some articles of clothing during an April 4 river search for Nguyen's body.

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Nguyen went missing three days before the Red River at Fargo-Moorhead crested at a record level of 40.82 feet.

The case is no longer under investigation, Renner said.

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