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Edgerton transplant goes well

Kyle Edgerton, superintendent of the Fargo Catholic Schools Network, underwent liver transplant surgery at a Minneapolis hospital Wednesday and is recovering.

Kyle Edgerton, superintendent of the Fargo Catholic Schools Network, underwent liver transplant surgery at a Minneapolis hospital Wednesday and is recovering.

"We are thankful that Kyle's transplant surgery went well, and we pray that God will strengthen him and his family as he recovers in the weeks ahead," said the Rev. Gregory Schlesselmann, chairman of the Catholic Schools Network board of directors. "Kyle is looking forward to returning to his office in the fall to kick off his fourth school year with the Fargo Catholic Schools Network. We look forward to that day, as well."

The Fargo diocese had no information to release on Edgerton's condition Friday.

Edgerton, 41, suffers from primary sclerosing cholangitis. The disease scars liver bile ducts, eventually causing blockages that can lead to liver failure, according to the National Institutes of Health

Edgerton was named superintendent of Fargo's Catholic schools in May 2004.

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He and his wife, Ruth, have three daughters.

Donations to help defray Edgerton's medical expenses can be sent to: Kyle Edgerton Family Benefit Fund, c/o Wells Fargo Bank, 406 Main Ave., Fargo, ND 58126.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Helmut Schmidt at (701) 241-5583

Helmut Schmidt is a reporter for The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead's business news team. Readers can reach him by email at hschmidt@forumcomm.com, or by calling (701) 241-5583.
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