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Fargo officer’s job at stake after internal investigation

FARGO - Officer David Boelke was recently the subject of an internal investigation by the Fargo Police Department, and his job is apparently at risk.Chief David Todd confirmed Wednesday, Aug. 2, that a probe was opened in the spring and closed in...

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Fargo Police Officer David Boelke
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FARGO – Officer David Boelke was recently the subject of an internal investigation by the Fargo Police Department, and his job is apparently at risk.

Chief David Todd confirmed Wednesday, Aug. 2, that a probe was opened in the spring and closed in June, but declined to discuss the nature of the investigation. He said Boelke is currently on paid administrative leave.

According to an iPetitions page supporting Boelke , he was “accused of dishonesty during an internal investigation (and) is now facing termination.” But it also said he has provided “substantial evidence in his favor including a lie detector test which he passed showing no deception.”

The petition, with more than 200 signatures, seeks Boelke’s continued employment with the Police Department. Several people describing themselves as former colleagues said they would vouch for his character.

Boelke was given the Life Saving medal in 2016, 2013, 2011 and 2009, according to Forum archives. He has also been president of the North Dakota Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 1.
The Forum has requested records from the investigation and Boelke’s personnel file. Sgt. Jared Crane with the department’s Office of Professional Standards said he is still redacting the files and will provide them as soon as he can.

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A phone message left for Boelke’s attorney, Mark Friese, was not immediately returned Wednesday.

Todd said Friese has asked for time to respond to the investigation. The chief said he hopes to reach a disposition on the matter soon.

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Fargo Police Chief David Todd

Related Topics: POLICE
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