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Fargo Park District moves to protect LGBT employees

FARGO - The Fargo Park Board on Tuesday voted unanimously to protect gay employees from discrimination and harassment in the workplace.

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FARGO – The Fargo Park Board on Tuesday voted unanimously to protect gay employees from discrimination and harassment in the workplace.

Park District policy was amended to add sexual orientation to a long list of protected classes, which include race, religion, national origin and age, to name a few.

The board also added gender identity to the list of classes protected from harassment; a separate policy already prohibits discrimination in matters of employment on the basis of gender identity.

The policy change was merely technical, said Jim Larson, the Park District's human resources director. He said the Park District already considered discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation to be unacceptable.

The change was not spurred by any complaint from an employee or the public, he said.

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The recommendation to make the change came from the Parks District Personnel Committee, which considered the same issue in 2013 but did not recommend adding sexual orientation to the list of protected classes.

Larson said he was not sure why committee members at the time chose not to recommend the policy change.

The state House in April killed a bill that would have outlawed discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

Related Topics: PARK BOARD
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