Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Fargo student pleads guilty to sexual abuse

A 19-year-old Fargo North student accused of sexually abusing a girl repeatedly for nearly three years pleaded guilty this afternoon to a felony charge that carries a maximum sentence of life in prison without parole.

A 19-year-old Fargo North student accused of sexually abusing a girl repeatedly for nearly three years pleaded guilty this afternoon to a felony charge that carries a maximum sentence of life in prison without parole.

Nathan Bryan Munter pleaded guilty to the Class AA felony gross sexual imposition charge, which will likely require him to register as a sex offender for life.

According to Cass County District Court documents:

The charge stems from incidents taking place between November 2003 and July 2006 involving a girl when she was between the ages of 10 and 12.

The victim, who is not a student at Fargo North, told police Munter forced her into a closet in winter 2005 and raped her, stopping when she started to cry and starting again when she stopped.

ADVERTISEMENT

This afternoon, Munter admitted the incident took place.

East Central District Judge Wade Webb ordered a pre-sentence investigation and a risk assessment to be completed before Munter is sen-tenced.

Munter remains out of jail after posting $1,000 cash bail in March. He has been receiving homebound schooling since his March arraignment.

For the complete story, check out Tuesday's Forum.

What To Read Next
Host Bryan Piatt is joined by Matt Entz, head coach of the North Dakota State Bison football team, to discuss the pressures of leading the program and how mental health is addressed with his players.
Artificial intelligence can now act as an artist or a writer. Does that mean AI is ready to play doctor? Many institutions, including Mayo Clinic, believe that AI is ready to become a useful tool.
Columnist Carol Bradley Bursack lists the various reason why some older adults may begin to shuffle as they age.
The Buffalo Bills safety who suffered a cardiac arrest on Monday Night Football in January is urging people to learn how to save lives the way his was saved.