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Fargo woman pleads guilty to child abuse

A Fargo woman accused of pushing her 2-year-old daughter down a flight of stairs pleaded guilty to child abuse and other charges Thursday in Cass County District Court.

A Fargo woman accused of pushing her 2-year-old daughter down a flight of stairs pleaded guilty to child abuse and other charges Thursday in Cass County District Court.

Heather M. Amundson, 23, was arguing with her husband, James, when she threatened to kill her 2-year-old daughter, then pushed her down a flight of stairs April 13, Assistant State's Attorney Trent Mahler said.

The Fargo woman called police to a residence at 300 7th St. N. and reported her husband slapped her during the argument. She later recanted the accusation, Mahler said.

Amundson pleaded guilty Thursday to felony charges of child abuse, terrorizing and a misdemeanor offense of making a false report to police.

East Central District Judge Norman Backes ordered Amundson to serve a year in prison, suspending all but seven days of the sentence.

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Backes ordered Amundson to serve the remaining 358 days on supervised release. He also ordered her to undergo a psychological evaluation.

Amundson's daughter was not seriously hurt, but was taken into custody by Cass County Social Services, Mahler said.

He said he thinks the girl will remain in the county's care.

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