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Flipping for pancakes: Kiwanis Pancake Karnival as big as ever

FARGO-The annual Kiwanis Pancake Karnival at the Fargodome brings the people of Fargo-Moorhead together around a shared love of pancakes, sausage and community.The giant pancake feed, which serves an average of 10-13,000 guests per year, benefits...

Hundreds of customers line up for pancakes Saturday, March 12, 2016, during the Fargo Kiwanis Club Pancake Karnival at the Fargodome.David Samson / The Forum
Hundreds of customers line up for pancakes Saturday, March 12, 2016, during the Fargo Kiwanis Club Pancake Karnival at the Fargodome.David Samson / The Forum

FARGO-The annual Kiwanis Pancake Karnival at the Fargodome brings the people of Fargo-Moorhead together around a shared love of pancakes, sausage and community.

The giant pancake feed, which serves an average of 10-13,000 guests per year, benefits many local charities and raised over $50,000 in 2015.

Most years the Pancake Karnival occurs in the second week of February, but this year, conflicts with the Fargodome pushed it to Saturday. There was some concern that attendance would drop this year as a result, but that does not appear to be the case.

"I think any time you plan an event of this size, there's so many variables that can go into it between the weather and other events going on, they're a little bit out of our control," Kiwanis Pancake Chair Bret Kinzler said. "We've been consistent around 10-13,000 people on an annual basis and looking to be right in that range again. We are running 300 or 400 people ahead of average right now. So it's looking good."

Among the 10-13,000 expected guests this year were Michael and Cami Barber of West Fargo and their two children, Hayden and Corbin. Michael says his favorite part of the event is the sausage, but the kids couldn't wait to finish breakfast and go play on the 14 inflatable games.

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"The food is always awesome," Michael Barber said. "We were excited to get the pancakes and then hit the bounce houses. It's hard to even keep them to eat, they want to hit the bounce houses really bad."

Ruby Kolpack and Fraser Child Care Center received the Kiwanis Community Champion for Kids individual and organization awards at the event. The award honors individuals and organizations who have enhanced the lives of children in the area.

Kolpack is a child care licensing specialist for the United Way and has been a board member for the United Way, Child Care Resource and Referral, YMCA, Fargo Public Schools' Family and Consumer Science Program and the Jeremiah Program.

Fraser Child Care Center provides a place for children with special needs and normally developing children a place to grow and learn together in an inclusive setting that encourages diversity.

Related Topics: FARGODOME
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