Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Flood threat eases

The National Weather Service issued a flood warning for Fargo and Wahpeton, N.D., on Friday, but later reduced its predictions. In fact, the warning of moderate flooding for Fargo was canceled, and Wahpeton's warning was reduced from heavy floodi...

749501+floodsign1.jpg

The National Weather Service issued a flood warning for Fargo and Wahpeton, N.D., on Friday, but later reduced its predictions.

In fact, the warning of moderate flooding for Fargo was canceled, and Wahpeton's warning was reduced from heavy flooding to moderate.

The Red River at Wahpeton is now predicted to crest at 11.8 feet on Monday. Its level was at 8.4 feet on Friday evening, with a flood stage of 10 feet.

National Weather Service meteorologist Greg Gust said the original warning was issued when heavy rains were expected south of Fargo in what's considered the headwaters of the Red River. The area had already been hit with rain earlier in the week.

Instead, the heavy rains hit in the Fargo area.

ADVERTISEMENT

"It's just being 50 miles off in forecasting where the heavy rain is," Gust said.

Rain flooded streets in Fargo on Friday night, partly because leaves plugged inlets to the city drain system, said Lee Anderson, a supervisor with the city Street Department.

Streets temporarily flooded in residential areas from 13th Avenue South to 19th Avenue North as well as around West Acres mall, Anderson said.

The weather service expected 1½ inches of rain by this afternoon.

The rainfall likely will cause flooding in low-lying areas along the Red River, but not enough to worry Fargo Public Works Director Dennis Walaker.

"We'll continue to monitor the situation, but right now we don't have any major concerns," Walaker said.

Walaker expected bike paths in Lindenwood Park to flood, and Elm Street likely would be closed as the Red River rises past flood stage, he said.

WDAY meteorologist John Wheeler did not expect anything but low areas near the Red River to flood.

ADVERTISEMENT

"I don't think it should be anything more than a nuisance," he said.

Wheeler said the unusual weather is caused by a strong area of pressure coming out of the southwest. It created a south wind filled with water vapor that traveled from the Gulf of Mexico into North Dakota and Minnesota.

"That air is laden with moisture," he said.

This week's heavy rains could affect spring flooding, though fall rain is just one of many factors, among them winter snows and spring rains, Wheeler said.

"Frankly, fall rain is nothing to worry about in the spring," Wheeler said. "It's just one more thing that they'll have to consider."

Readers can reach Forum reporter Andrea Domaskin at (701) 241-5556

What To Read Next
The Buffalo Bills safety who suffered a cardiac arrest on Monday Night Football in January is urging people to learn how to save lives the way his was saved.
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
A Sanford doctor says moderate cold exposure could be the boost people need for their day.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.