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Former Sen. Kent Conrad's name appears on ISIS 'hit list'

FARGO -- Former U.S. Sen. Kent Conrad, D-N.D., has been told that he's one of several hundred people included on a "hit list" that has been circulating online in a video sent to terrorist operatives by the Islamic State militant group known as ISIS.

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Former U.S. Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) meets with The Forum's editorial board Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, in Fargo. Forum file photo
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FARGO - Former U.S. Sen. Kent Conrad, D-N.D., has been told that he's one of several hundred people included on a "hit list" that has been circulating online in a video sent to terrorist operatives by the Islamic State militant group known as ISIS.

Conrad learned his name was included in a video posted Sunday to the Internet for followers of the "Army of the Caliphate."

A woman who monitors terrorist sites on the Internet saw the video soon after it appeared Sunday and promptly contacted Conrad's daughter, a friend.

"She's somebody that monitors these sites and works with the FBI to monitor these sites," Conrad said Monday.

Conrad's name was on the list, which included the names of FBI agents, CIA agents, Air Force officers and other officials.

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The name of Hillary Clinton, the former U.S. secretary of state, U.S. senator and current Democratic presidential candidate, was next to Conrad's on the list, Conrad said.

The list apparently was sent out in response to the killing of a man who was a cyber expert for ISIS, a terrorist organization in the Middle East and Africa.

"The people who worked with him are trying to get revenge," Conrad said. "This is retribution."

The woman immediately notified the FBI, and presumably other agencies have been contacted, Conrad said.

"I did contact the White House and they told me they'd turn it over to our cybersecurity people," he said.

Conrad suspects he might have been targeted as a former member of the Senate Intelligence Committee. Also, as a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, he once offered an amendment allocating $500 million to target Osama bin Laden, the former Al Qaeda leader who was later killed by U.S. forces.

This isn't the first time Conrad, who served in the Senate from 1987 to 2013, has been the target death threats. He received threats on his life three times as a U.S. senator and once when he was North Dakota state tax commissioner, he said.

Since retiring from the Senate, Conrad has served on the bipartisan Commission on Retirement Security and Personal Savings. He also serves on several company boards of directors.

Related Topics: NORTH DAKOTA
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