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Grand Forks attorney, citing PTSD, ruled incapacitated

GRAND FORKS - Grand Forks attorney Lee R. Finstad was ruled incapacitated to practice law, at his own request, by the state Supreme Court on Friday. The cause was "severe and chronic symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder," according to the c...

Lee Finstad

GRAND FORKS - Grand Forks attorney Lee R. Finstad was ruled incapacitated to practice law, at his own request, by the state Supreme Court on Friday.

The cause was "severe and chronic symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder," according to the court ruling. Finstad asserts that "he experiences a high degree of anxiety, intrusive thoughts about Vietnam, flashbacks, and the emotional avoidance of people which has resulted in him being incapacitated to practice law," the ruling said.

He applied for incapacitated status Thursday.

As part of its ruling, the court also ordered that Finstad's clients be notified, and that its disciplinary counsel name a trustee to take possession of Finstad's files and, if needed, take on his clients.

Finstad specialized in veterans issues and had served briefly as veterans service officer for Grand Forks County. The County Commission, which disliked his management style, terminated him in September.

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