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Grand Forks School Board still negotiating with Moorhead Superintendent Larry Nybladh

GRAND FORKS - The school board here on Monday night continued to negotiate a contract with Moorhead Superintendent Larry Nybladh. The board on Thursday offered its vacant superintendent position to Nybladh, who is from the Stephen-Argyle (Minn.) ...

Larry Nybladh

GRAND FORKS - The school board here on Monday night continued to negotiate a contract with Moorhead Superintendent Larry Nybladh.

The board on Thursday offered its vacant superintendent position to Nybladh, who is from the Stephen-Argyle (Minn.) area and now is the superintendent at Moorhead.

Since the offer, the School Board has been working on negotiating a contract with Nybladh. Monday night was the second meeting in the past week that included an executive session for those negotiations.

"I really don't have a timeline," School Board President Mike St. Onge said after the meeting Monday. "My hope is to get this wrapped up as soon as possible."

The process becomes longer because the board must hold a meeting every time it wants to discuss these issues to ||?Page=002 Column=002 Loose,0031.05?||comply with open meetings laws. No business can be conducted outside the board meetings, even though executive sessions are closed meetings.

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"We don't ever talk about this until we come in here," St. Onge said.

Each time the board holds a closed session for contract negotiations, a draft will be presented to Nybladh.

"He looks at that draft, and then we go from there again," St. Onge said of the process.

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