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Here's how you can help support the family of Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind

FARGO -- Donations for Haisley Jo, daughter of Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind and Ashton Matheny, are now being accepted at U.S. Bank.The LaFontaine-Greywind family set up the account on Monday, Aug. 28, a bank spokesman said. Donations can be made ...

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A memorial to slain Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind builds Monday, Aug. 28, 2017, in front of her home at 2825 9th St. N., Fargo.Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor
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FARGO - Donations for Haisley Jo, daughter of Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind and Ashton Matheny, are now being accepted at U.S. Bank.

The LaFontaine-Greywind family set up the account on Monday, Aug. 28, a bank spokesman said. Donations can be made in person at any of the bank’s locations or by mail. Checks should be made out to the “Haisley Jo Donation Fund.”

Mail donations should be sent to: Haisley Jo Donation Fund, U.S. Bank, 505 2nd Ave. N., Fargo, ND, 58102. Online donations are not yet possible.

Family and friends warn the public to be wary of fraudulent sites seeking donations in the woman or child’s names. No other fundraising sources have been approved by the family and are likely fraudulent.

The public has asked about making other kinds of donations for the child, but the family has not yet made any arrangements for accepting such donations.

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Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind’s body was found Sunday, Aug. 27. The pregnant 22-year-old had been missing since Aug. 19. Her baby was found Aug. 24 with a woman now charged along with a man with kidnapping and killing the mother and kidnapping the baby.

Family and friends are also asking people to light a red light at their front door or porch for eight nights, the number of nights LaFontaine-Greywind was missing.

Related Topics: CRIMEPOLICE
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