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Hoeven, Heitkamp issue statements regarding Trump comments

FARGO -- U.S. Sens. John Hoeven, R-N.D., and Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., issued statements Saturday, Oct. 8, regarding inappropriate comments presidential candidate Donald Trump made in a recently released 2005 video.

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U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Henderson, Nevada October 5, 2016. REUTERS/David Becker
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FARGO - U.S. Sens. John Hoeven, R-N.D., and Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., issued statements Saturday, Oct. 8, regarding inappropriate comments presidential candidate Donald Trump made in a recently released 2005 video.

"Donald Trump's comments were offensive and wrong," Hoeven said in the statement. "He not only needs to apologize, he needs to show through his words and actions that he does not believe in the views expressed in the video."

In her statement, Heitkamp said: "These vulgar and offensive comments reaffirm the extraordinary disrespect toward women - as well as many others - we have already come to expect from Donald Trump, but they're not what the American people deserve, and they're not what North Dakotans should accept in a presidential candidate."

U.S. Rep. Kevin Cramer said Friday, Oct. 7, before he had seen the news story, that he did not condone the explicit remarks. "I would fully expect that his attitude and demeanor would have changed in the meantime and going forward."

Cramer further expressed that Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's "actions and words would land most people in jail."

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The video released this week was of remarks exchanged between the GOP presidential nominee and Billy Bush of "Access Hollywood" as the duo arrived on the set of the soap opera "Days of Our Lives" in advance of Trump's appearance on the show. Trump has since apologized for his comments.

Related Topics: KEVIN CRAMERHEIDI HEITKAMP
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