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Heat waves can kill. Know how to keep babies, adults and older people safe when temperatures spike

Your body adjusts to hot weather slowly. So when heat waves hit, you need to know how to hydrate and stay cool to avoid heat-related illness. This is especially true for babies and older adults. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams gets tips from an emergency medicine doctor about how to stay healthy in extreme heat.

Popsicles can be a refreshing treat on a hot day.
Popsicles can be a refreshing treat on a hot day.
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ROCHESTER, Minn. — Everyone is at risk of heat-related illness when temperatures and humidity spike. You might start to feel tired, dizzy, sweaty and your heart may race.

"As it gets worse and worse, you end up getting a little confused, not thinking quite straight and you can get very, very sick," said Dr. James Miner , head of Emergency Medicine at Hennepin County Medical Center and a professor at the University of Minnesota Medical School. "We've actually seen people die from getting too hot."

Sweating is your body's cooling mechanism. So when temperatures soar, you need more liquid, especially if you're not used to hot weather.

Miner also says that people should know signs and symptoms of heat-related illness for babies, adults and elderly adults.

Watch or listen to this episode of Health Fusion to hear more about how to stay healthy when temperatures soar.

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For more hot weather health information, check out these related stories:

Drinking liquid in hot weather is key to avoiding heat-related illness. How much do you need and what should you drink? In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams gets heatwave hydration info from an Emergency Medicine doctor.
Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are serious conditions that can happen to anyone when the temperature and humidity soar. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams highlights signs and symptoms of heat-related illnesses and gives tips from experts on what to do if they happen.

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Follow the  Health Fusion podcast on  Apple,   Spotify and  Google podcasts. For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at  vwilliams@newsmd.com. Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

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Opinion by Viv Williams
Viv Williams hosts the NewsMD podcast and column, "Health Fusion." She is an Emmy (and other) award-winning health and medical reporter whose stories have run on TV, digital and newspaper outlets nationwide. Viv is passionate about boosting people's health and happiness by helping them access credible, reliable and research-based health information from top experts. She regularly interviews experts and patients from leading medical institutions, such as Mayo Clinic.
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