Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Judges rule Bala is due more than $110,000 in back rent

Susan Bala won another round in court recently when appeals judges ruled that she is owed more than $110,000 in back rent. The ruling by a panel of the 8th Circuit U.S.

Susan Bala
We are part of The Trust Project.

Susan Bala won another round in court recently when appeals judges ruled that she is owed more than $110,000 in back rent.

The ruling by a panel of the 8th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals upholds an earlier decision by the bankruptcy judge determining that Bala was entitled to collect for the back rent.

The dispute arose from the prosecution of Bala's now-defunct Racing Services Inc., a Fargo-based company that handled off-track bets for simulcast horse races.

Bala and RSI were exonerated two years ago when appeals judges threw out federal convictions, determining there was no legal basis for the federal charges.

The rents on the RSI building, 901 28th St. S., accrued during 11 months by the RSI estate. Bala personally paid the debt from proceeds when the building was sold five years ago.

ADVERTISEMENT

She is entitled to $110,218, plus accumulated interest. Kip Kaler, the bankruptcy trustee, appealed the decision by U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge William Hill.

Bala's lawyers declined to comment Tuesday on the ruling. Drew Wrigley, the U.S. attorney for North Dakota, was not immediately available for comment late Tuesday afternoon.

Bala, who now lives in Moorhead, has filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Bismarck claiming malicious prosecution by Wrigley and Wayne Stenehjem, the North Dakota attorney general.

Both Wrigley and Stenehjem deny the allegations and are seeking dismissal of the lawsuit.

Bala, who spent 523 days in prison, contends that her constitutional rights were violated.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Patrick Springer at (701) 241-5522

What to read next
Panic attacks can be a frightening experience. In this episode of 'Take What Serves. Leave the Rest,' host Brian Piatt talks with Dr. Chad Puffer, a child and adolescent psychiatrist, about his own experiences with panic attacks and what is happening inside your body when they occur.
This week, Carol Bradley Bursack offers ways to handle a relative who has suddenly started swearing.
Do you overindulge on Thanksgiving? A lot of people do. It can be hard to resist recipes you only get during the holidays. But if you chow down on foods and drinks that are high in salt, fat or caffeine, you may be at risk of "holiday heart." Viv Williams has details from Mayo Clinic cardiologists in this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion."
Fargo native Bryan Piatt started struggling with anxiety in middle school, and it followed him into a broadcast journalism career. Now, he's sharing his story in hopes of bringing more people into the conversation. Forum Communications is proud to bring you his podcast, "Take What Serves. Leave the Rest."