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LATEST: Corps diversion information shows buyouts warranted for all of Oxbow, Hickson and Bakke subdivision

FARGO - The latest impacts of a Red River diversion around Fargo-Moorhead show levels that would warrant buyouts of all of the homes in Oxbow, Hickson and Bakke subdivision.

FARGO - The latest impacts of a Red River diversion around Fargo-Moorhead show levels that would warrant buyouts of all of the homes in Oxbow, Hickson and Bakke subdivision.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers presented the newest information this morning in Fargo.

Those impacts in communities to the south of Fargo also mean a growing price tag for the project, bringing the latest estimate to $1.7 billion.

Oxbow Mayor Jim Nyhof said the latest information answered some of his questions, but he still wants more information.

The corps completed a rough study of moving the diversion channel south to include Oxbow. Initial estimates show it would cost an additional $35 million to move the channel, but those figures don't include study or mitigation of possible environmental impacts, said Terri Williams of the corps.

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The local technical team, however, is committed to continue studying the southern alignment, said Fargo City Engineer Mark Bittner.

Nyhof said the information presented today makes him more supportive of a Minnesota-side channel because it wouldn't put extra water on Oxbow.

The North Dakota channel would increase water in Oxbow, Bakke and Hickson by at least 3 feet, according to corps estimates.

Fargo, Moorhead, Cass and Clay counties have until April 11 to reaffirm their support for the North Dakota channel.

For more on this story, read Thursday's Forum.

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