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Lecture on 'spirit of love' set Oct. 27 at Concordia

MOORHEAD-Concordia College will present the Oen Fellowship Lecture, "Embracing the Other: The Transformative Spirit of Love" at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, in the Centrum, Knutson Campus Center.The lecture is free and open to the public.Grace Ji-Su...

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MOORHEAD-Concordia College will present the Oen Fellowship Lecture, "Embracing the Other: The Transformative Spirit of Love" at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, in the Centrum, Knutson Campus Center.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

Grace Ji-Sun Kim will be speaking about embracing "the other," in the sense of people and cultures, as well as the environment.

An ordained pastor in the Presbyterian Church (USA), Kim is associate professor of theology at Earlham School of Religion in Richmond, Ind. She specializes in writing and teaching constructive, feminist, post-colonial, and Asian-American theology with a focus on the environment.

Her most recent book, "Making Peace with the Earth: Action and Advocacy for Climate Justice," presents an environmental ethic within the context of ecological theology.

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