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Longtime Calif. Rep. Waxman to retire

WASHINGTON - U.S. Representative Henry Waxman, a 20-term Democrat from California, said on Thursday he will not seek re-election this year. "In 1974, I announced my first campaign for Congress," Waxman, 74, said in a statement. "Today, I am annou...

WASHINGTON - U.S. Representative Henry Waxman, a 20-term Democrat from California, said on Thursday he will not seek re-election this year.

"In 1974, I announced my first campaign for Congress," Waxman, 74, said in a statement. "Today, I am announcing that I have run my last campaign. I will not seek re-election to the Congress and will leave after 40 years in office at the end of this year."

WASHINGTON, Jan 30 (Reuters) - Thirty-nine U.S. representatives and senators have announced plans to leave their seats in Congress in advance of mid-term elections in November, including 22 Republicans and 17 Democrats.

The latest to announce his departure was Representative Henry Waxman, a 20-term Democrat from California.

U.S. HOUSE

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Republicans currently control the House 232 to 200 with three vacancies.

House Republicans (19) Representative Trey Radel, Florida (served less than one full term, resigned) Representative Shelley Moore Capito, West Virginia (six terms, seeking Senate seat) Representative Paul Broun, Georgia (three terms, seeking Senate seat) Representative Bill Cassidy, Louisiana (three terms, seeking Senate seat) Representative Phil Gingrey, Georgia (six terms, seeking Senate seat) Representative Jack Kingston, Georgia (11 terms, seeking Senate seat) Representative Michele Bachmann, Minnesota (four terms) Representative John Campbell, California (five terms) Representative Tom Cotton, Arkansas (one term, seeking Senate seat) Representative Spencer Bachus, Alabama (11 terms) Representative Tim Griffin, Arkansas (two terms) Representative Jon Runyan, New Jersey (two terms) Representative Steve Daines, Montana (one term, seeking Senate seat) Representative Howard Coble, North Carolina (served 15 terms) Representative Steve Stockman, Texas (two terms, seeking Senate seat) Representative Frank Wolf, Virginia (17 terms) Representative Tom Latham, Iowa (10 terms) Representative Jim Gerlach, Pennsylvania (six terms) Representative Buck McKeon, California (11 terms)

House Democrats (12) Representative Henry Waxman, California (20 terms) Representative Bruce Braley, Iowa (four terms, seeking Senate seat) Representative Gary Peters, Michigan (three terms, seeking Senate seat) Representative Colleen Hanabusa, Hawaii (two terms, seeking Senate seat) Representative Michael Michaud, Maine (six terms, seeking governorship) Representative Jim Matheson, Utah (seven terms) Representative Carolyn McCarthy, New York (nine terms) Representative Mike McIntyre, North Carolina (nine terms) Representative George Miller, California (20 terms) Representative Bill Owens, New York (two terms) Representative Jim Moran, Virginia (12 terms) Representative Allyson Schwartz, Pennsylvania (five terms, seeking governorship)

U.S. SENATE

Democrats currently control the Senate, 55-45.

Senate Republicans (3) Senator Saxby Chambliss, Georgia (two terms) Senator Tom Coburn, Oklahoma (two terms) Senator Mike Johanns, Nebraska (one term)

Senate Democrats (5) Senator Tom Harkin, Iowa (five terms) Senator Tim Johnson, South Dakota (three terms) Senator Carl Levin, Michigan (six terms) Senator Jay Rockefeller, West Virginia (five terms) Senator Max Baucus, Montana (six terms, leaving once confirmed as U.S. ambassador to China)

Sources: Reuters, House Press Gallery, Senate Periodical Press Gallery

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