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Look what happened when a young man tapped a WDAY Honor Flight veteran on the shoulder

Washington D.C. - One of the best things about the WDAY Honor Flight is when random strangers come up to the veterans and thank them for their service. It happens throughout the trip to our nation's capital-no matter what monument they visit.

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Washington D.C. - One of the best things about the WDAY Honor Flight is when random strangers come up to the veterans and thank them for their service. It happens throughout the trip to our nation’s capital–no matter what monument they visit.

On Monday, Nov. 5, during the last day of the most recent Honor Flight out of Fargo, WWII veteran Harold Zilmer was visiting the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial with his granddaughter who accompanied him on the trip. As the two walked along the cobblestone path, a young man wearing a yarmulke starting running after them. As he reached Zilmer he tapped him on the shoulder and explained that he was from Israel and that both his grandmothers survived Auschwitz. He was at a loss for words as he thanked Zilmer for helping save the world from evil.

For more coverage of the November WDAY Honor Flight trip, go to WDAY.com .

For more information on the “In Their Honor: WDAY Honor Flight 2007-2017” book, click here

Tracy Briggs is a News, Lifestyle and History reporter with Forum Communications with more than 30 years of experience.
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