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Lubbock Lions no threat to Fargo pancake pros

Fargo's official flapjack record stands. But the president of the Lubbock (Texas) Lions Club said his group expects to reclaim the record next year. The Lubbock (Texas) Lions Club on Saturday made an estimated - but unofficial - 35,577 pancakes a...

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Fargo's official flapjack record stands.

But the president of the Lubbock (Texas) Lions Club said his group expects to reclaim the record next year.

The Lubbock (Texas) Lions Club on Saturday made an estimated - but unofficial - 35,577 pancakes at its 56th annual pancake festival.

That would exceed the 34,818 pancakes the Fargo Kiwanis Club made on Feb. 9, setting a Guinness World Record for flapjacks made in eight hours.

Fargo's record topped the previous mark of 30,724 set by the Lubbock Lions Club in 2002.

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The Lions Club learned too late of Fargo's record-setting effort to go through the procedures necessary to have its Saturday results recognized as a Guinness World Record, said Greg Varoff, president of the Lubbock group.

"We just didn't have the time," he said.

Next year, however, the Lions Club will take the necessary steps and expects to recapture the pancake record from Fargo, he said.

Arday Ardayfio, an organizer of Fargo's event, said he wouldn't be surprised if Fargo and Lubbock establish a running rivalry in which the two cities repeatedly try to outdo each other.

If Lubbock does regain the official record in 2009, Fargo could push to recapture the title in 2010, he said.

Varoff said the rivalry is in good fun and for a good cause.

"The real winners are the charities served by the two organizations," he said.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Jonathan Knutson at (701) 241-5530

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