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Mandan woman pleads guilty to abuse-neglect charge

MANDAN, N.D. (AP) - A woman has pleaded guilty to charges of child abuse or neglect and drunken driving in an incident in which police found her baby wedged behind the driver's seat of her car.

MANDAN, N.D. (AP) - A woman has pleaded guilty to charges of child abuse or neglect and drunken driving in an incident in which police found her baby wedged behind the driver's seat of her car.

A presentence review was ordered for Sarah Gwin, 25, of Mandan, who entered her pleas Friday. She faces up to 10 years in prison on the felony abuse or neglect charge and up to one year on the misdemeanor charge of driving under the influence with a minor present.

Police said Gwin was arrested Aug. 21, after a detective driving home from an investigation saw her driving a car erratically, weaving in and out of lanes and failing to stop at stop signs.

The baby boy was found behind the driver's seat, wedged around a large detergent bottle, the front driver's seat backrest and the center console armrest, police said. The child, then 8 months old, was not hurt and was turned over to a relative, police said.

Kent Morrow, Gwin's appointed attorney, said Friday that Gwin currently is in the women's prison in New England, in southwestern North Dakota.

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South Central District Judge David Reich ordered a presentence investigation.

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