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Mayo Clinic podcast: Vaccines and kids — what you need to know about COVID-19, flu

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Angela Mattke, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician and host of Ask The Mayo Mom, discusses children and vaccines with Dr. Robert Jacobson, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician

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With flu season approaching, Mayo Clinic experts remind parents of the importance of vaccinating children for influenza and COVID-19 when possible.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends everyone 6 months and older get vaccinated for flu each year. The CDC also says people who are eligible can be vaccinated for flu and COVID-19 at the same time.

Currently, children ages 12 and older are permitted to get vaccinated for COVID-19 using the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine under terms of the Food and Drug Administration's emergency use authorization. Experts anticipate that the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine will soon be approved for emergency use authorization for children 5-11.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast , Dr. Angela Mattke , a Mayo Clinic pediatrician and host of Ask The Mayo Mom , discusses children and vaccines with Dr. Robert Jacobson , a Mayo Clinic pediatrician. Jacobson co-chairs the AskMayoExpert Knowledge Content Board on Immunizations and Vaccinations, and he is medical director for Mayo Clinic's Primary Care in Southeast Minnesota Immunization Program.

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