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McFeely: Now panicking about Trump, GOP has nobody to blame but itself

FARGO - It is Super Tuesday, which is not to be confused with Super Sunday. One is the day when something incredibly important happens, the other is when candidates in the two major political parties can take a major step toward the Oval Office.

Mike McFeely
Mike McFeely

FARGO – It is Super Tuesday, which is not to be confused with Super Sunday. One is the day when something incredibly important happens, the other is when candidates in the two major political parties can take a major step toward the Oval Office. We won't bore you with the details, but a massive chunk of delegates will be awarded to Republican and Democratic candidates through primaries and caucuses in 13 states. This includes Minnesota, and it's not yet clear which candidates will emerge as winners in the Land of Weird Political Choices (Yes, we mean Jesse Ventura). Read more Mike McFeely columns  On one side, it might be Clinton or it might be Sanders. On the other, it might be Cruz or it might be Rubio. Or it might be Trump. Man, we hope it's Trump. It would be wonderful if it is Trump-as in Donald J., which rhymes with KKK-because watching the Republican power brokers fret and sweat over the possibility of him getting the nomination has been worth every second of suffering through Ben Carson's public-speaking skills. "What are we to do?" they wail. "He is not a real Republican!" they screech. "He'll doom us in November!" they bawl.
To which those of us who are watching from afar and a little to the left respond, "Gee, that's too bad. But you have nobody to blame but yourselves." Trump, you see, is a product of seven years of anger stirred up by the Republican Party in response to the election of Barack Obama as president. For Obama's entire presidency, even though he was twice duly and legally elected by a solid majority of American citizens, Republicans have questioned his credibility and in some cases his birthplace and citizenship. That has stirred anger and distrust. Some Republicans have openly wondered, without backlash or reprisal from their party, if Obama is actually a Muslim who is paving the way for Islamists to take over the government. More anger and distrust. Republicans, with their friends the National Rifle Association, have pushed a narrative that Obama's true motive is to confiscate everybody's guns. Anger. Distrust. Republicans have turned away from serious talk about immigration reform and instead become hyper-xenophobic and suspicious of people coming to this country. They've continued to demonize those who receive certain kinds of government assistance ("welfare," but not tax breaks or corporate subsidies). They've hammered a narrative that they are paying taxes while most others aren't and, in fact, are getting everything free (paid for, of course, by the taxes they are paying). They've used every opportunity to tell the world how Obama is ruining this once-great nation and how we have to "take our country back." Republicans have used every platform available to sell these talking points over and over and over. From the halls of Congress to talk-radio to Fox News to blogs and op/ed pieces. The president is a bum and this country is going to hell. And be afraid, be very afraid, of the future. They've whipped up their "base" into a froth of anger, fear and suspicion. They did it because it stymied the president, it worked to win congressional seats and governor races, and maybe even because they kind of enjoyed it. Republicans did everything they could to appeal to the lowest common denominator. Now they're baffled because the lowest common denominator is steamrolling to the nomination for president by using anger, fear and suspicion as the basis of his campaign. Build a wall! Keep out Muslims! She's ugly! He's stupid! They're all losers! And the crowds keep cheering and urging Donald to "tell it like it is." Trump's slogan is "Make America Great Again." Logically, this tells you he and his supporters believe America is not great now. If Obama were to stand before the TV cameras and say America is not great, he would be skewered and accused of trying to implement Sharia law. Trump says it and his supporters nod their heads and drool with adoration. Such is the presidential campaign of 2016, where everything seems a little bit goofy. It's just a little more so on the right side of the aisle. Consider the ferocity with which the GOP is trying to chop Trump's legs off because it doesn't want him to win. Consider, too, that congressional leaders are girding for a possible Trump presidency by basically saying they'll disown him if he wins. "We'll drop him like a hot rock," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has told colleagues, according to the New York Times. Funny. Republicans like McConnell, with their rhetoric, helped make Trump. And now they don't want him? Sorry, Mitch, he's all yours. You made him. You own him.FARGO – It is Super Tuesday, which is not to be confused with Super Sunday. One is the day when something incredibly important happens, the other is when candidates in the two major political parties can take a major step toward the Oval Office.We won't bore you with the details, but a massive chunk of delegates will be awarded to Republican and Democratic candidates through primaries and caucuses in 13 states. This includes Minnesota, and it's not yet clear which candidates will emerge as winners in the Land of Weird Political Choices (Yes, we mean Jesse Ventura).Read more Mike McFeely columns On one side, it might be Clinton or it might be Sanders.On the other, it might be Cruz or it might be Rubio.Or it might be Trump.Man, we hope it's Trump.It would be wonderful if it is Trump-as in Donald J., which rhymes with KKK-because watching the Republican power brokers fret and sweat over the possibility of him getting the nomination has been worth every second of suffering through Ben Carson's public-speaking skills."What are we to do?" they wail."He is not a real Republican!" they screech."He'll doom us in November!" they bawl.
To which those of us who are watching from afar and a little to the left respond, "Gee, that's too bad. But you have nobody to blame but yourselves."Trump, you see, is a product of seven years of anger stirred up by the Republican Party in response to the election of Barack Obama as president.For Obama's entire presidency, even though he was twice duly and legally elected by a solid majority of American citizens, Republicans have questioned his credibility and in some cases his birthplace and citizenship.That has stirred anger and distrust.Some Republicans have openly wondered, without backlash or reprisal from their party, if Obama is actually a Muslim who is paving the way for Islamists to take over the government.More anger and distrust.Republicans, with their friends the National Rifle Association, have pushed a narrative that Obama's true motive is to confiscate everybody's guns.Anger. Distrust.Republicans have turned away from serious talk about immigration reform and instead become hyper-xenophobic and suspicious of people coming to this country.They've continued to demonize those who receive certain kinds of government assistance ("welfare," but not tax breaks or corporate subsidies).They've hammered a narrative that they are paying taxes while most others aren't and, in fact, are getting everything free (paid for, of course, by the taxes they are paying).They've used every opportunity to tell the world how Obama is ruining this once-great nation and how we have to "take our country back."Republicans have used every platform available to sell these talking points over and over and over. From the halls of Congress to talk-radio to Fox News to blogs and op/ed pieces.The president is a bum and this country is going to hell. And be afraid, be very afraid, of the future.They've whipped up their "base" into a froth of anger, fear and suspicion. They did it because it stymied the president, it worked to win congressional seats and governor races, and maybe even because they kind of enjoyed it.Republicans did everything they could to appeal to the lowest common denominator.Now they're baffled because the lowest common denominator is steamrolling to the nomination for president by using anger, fear and suspicion as the basis of his campaign.Build a wall! Keep out Muslims! She's ugly! He's stupid! They're all losers!And the crowds keep cheering and urging Donald to "tell it like it is."Trump's slogan is "Make America Great Again." Logically, this tells you he and his supporters believe America is not great now. If Obama were to stand before the TV cameras and say America is not great, he would be skewered and accused of trying to implement Sharia law. Trump says it and his supporters nod their heads and drool with adoration.Such is the presidential campaign of 2016, where everything seems a little bit goofy. It's just a little more so on the right side of the aisle. Consider the ferocity with which the GOP is trying to chop Trump's legs off because it doesn't want him to win.Consider, too, that congressional leaders are girding for a possible Trump presidency by basically saying they'll disown him if he wins."We'll drop him like a hot rock," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has told colleagues, according to the New York Times.Funny. Republicans like McConnell, with their rhetoric, helped make Trump. And now they don't want him?Sorry, Mitch, he's all yours. You made him. You own him.

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