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Metro Transit mechanic was late for work, so he stole a bus, charges say

MINNEAPOLIS - A South St. Paul man, running late for his job as a Metro Transit mechanic, is accused of trying to take the bus to work in a more literal fashion than his employer intended.Gregory J. Jennrich, 31, was charged Friday in Hennepin Co...

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MINNEAPOLIS – A South St. Paul man, running late for his job as a Metro Transit mechanic, is accused of trying to take the bus to work in a more literal fashion than his employer intended.

Gregory J. Jennrich, 31, was charged Friday in Hennepin County District Court with felony theft of a motor vehicle after police said he stole an empty, idling bus Wednesday while the driver was on break.

According to court documents, the Route 75 bus was parked at a gas station at Robert Street and Marie Avenue in West St. Paul just before 10 p.m. It was running, but no passengers were aboard.

Jennrich, meanwhile, was on his way to work and stopped at the station. He was worried he was going to be late for work, so he took the bus, the charges said.

The bus driver reported that she emerged from the gas station to find the bus was gone.

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Metro Transit tracked it remotely as it went west on Interstate 494 toward a Metro Transit garage in Bloomington, where Jennrich works.

Police pulled the bus over, and Jennrich surrendered without incident, the charges said.

He was jailed in Hennepin County as of Friday, with a first appearance in court set for Monday.

The episode lasted about eight minutes, Metro Transit spokesman Howie Padilla said.

Jennrich has been employed with Metro Transit since April 2015. The agency will be "exploring his employment" in the coming weeks, Padilla said. Before this incident, he had no disciplinary actions on his record.

The Pioneer Press is a Forum News Service media partner.

Related Topics: CRIME
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