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Minn. senators pass bill to protect data

ST. PAUL - Minnesota senators unanimously passed a bill to crack down on public employees who improperly use individuals' private data, such as driver's licenses.

ST. PAUL - Minnesota senators unanimously passed a bill to crack down on public employees who improperly use individuals' private data, such as driver's licenses.

"It does provide some accountability," Sen. Scott Dibble, D-Minneapolis, said, before the 66-0 vote.

The Senate-passed bill is slightly different than one the House passed 132-0 last year, so the House must reconsider the bill before it heads to the governor for his signature.

Dibble's bill follows reports about various public employees with access to driver's licenses looked at information when with no official reason. Many of those accused of improperly calling up the data were men who looked at private information of well-known women such as television news reporters.

While the Dibble bill would increase penalties for improper access, he added that "more work is going to have to be done at some point in the future."

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The measure requires that private data only is available who need it for their jobs, and they can only access it while on duty.

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