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Minnesota may create online marriage database

There soon may be a statewide online index of marriage records that can be accessed from any county in Minnesota. The Minnesota Association of County Officers is proposing the creation of an Official Marriage Database - and Becker County has comm...

There soon may be a statewide online index of marriage records that can be accessed from any county in Minnesota.

The Minnesota Association of County Officers is proposing the creation of an Official Marriage Database - and Becker County has committed $2,000 toward the project.

The Becker County Board of Commissioners approved the request from County Recorder Darlene Maneval to withdraw the money from the Recorders Technology Fund as the county's share of the project.

The county's total commitment toward the MACO initiative includes $1,000 for the initial setup fee and $500 for maintenance in each of the first and second years of the project. According to the proposal, the initial setup fee is a one-time cost, and maintenance fees beyond the first two years of the project are not expected to exceed $500.

The county's participation is voluntary; however, any marriage data entered into the official database will remain there even in the event that the county withdraws from future involvement in the project, according to the terms of the agreement.

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The Detroit Lakes Tribune and The Forum are both owned by Forum Communications Co.

Minnesota may create online marriage database By Vicki Gerdes 20071215

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