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Moorhead man arrested in counterfeit case

A 41-year-old Moorhead man was in Clay County Jail Thursday night after Moorhead police arrested him in connection with passing counterfeit $100 bills.

A 41-year-old Moorhead man was in Clay County Jail Thursday night after Moorhead police arrested him in connection with passing counterfeit $100 bills.

Christopher Folorunso was arrested at 5:50 p.m. Thursday following a report last week of counterfeit money at a Fargo Stop-N-Go, Moorhead police said.

Wednesday night a man tried to pass fake $100 bills at the Moorhead Kmart, but fled when a suspicious clerk called police.

Thursday, Moorhead police refused to implicate Folorunso in any other counterfeiting incidents. They would not release any details of the man's arrest or whether he was found in possession of counterfeit money.

Fargo Police Lt. Tod Dahle said Thursday more than 20 counterfeit $100 bills have been passed in Fargo-Moorhead since July 30.

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On Aug. 13, a man purchased a money order with three fake $100 bills at Stop-N-Go at 3220 12th Ave. N. Surveillance tape from that incident was forwarded to the Fargo Police Department.

The counterfeit bills circulating through Fargo-Moorhead have similarities and are good copies of the $100 bill, Dahle said.

Tom Berg, an assistant manager at Scheels, said the bogus bill his store accepted Tuesday is the best fake he's seen in 30 years of retail.

The fake $100 passed at Scheels 13th Avenue Southwest store wasn't discovered until it got to the bank.

Berg examined the bill at the bank and was surprised it included many of the security features he tells employees to look for.

"Someone is very, very good with what they've done," he said.

The bill's watermark and silver security strip both showed up, Berg said.

The main difference in the counterfeit was the 100 in the bottom right corner did not have the color-shifting ink feature. In a genuine $100 bill, the color should change from black to green when the bill is tilted.

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Chuck Chadwick, manager of the Moorhead Kmart, said when he first learned of the circulating counterfeits, he contacted the bank and found out what to look for.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Amy Dalrymple at (701) 241-5590

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