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ND police chiefs want Legislature to take up campus police issue

FARGO - A North Dakota police chiefs group is set to begin lobbying state legislators to get a law on the books next session that details how campus police can operate, both on and off campus.

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FARGO - A North Dakota police chiefs group is set to begin lobbying state legislators to get a law on the books next session that details how campus police can operate, both on and off campus.

The effort is in response to a state Supreme Court ruling issued in September that stated North Dakota State University police do not have authority to make arrests off campus.

The ruling reversed a Cass County District Court judgment that upheld an NDSU officer's right to arrest then-18-year-old Morgan Kroschel off campus for driving under the influence of alcohol.

Campus police officials believe prohibiting campus police from arresting drunken drivers near universities puts the public at risk.

Police chiefs at a meeting of the North Dakota Chiefs of Police on Thursday said the state Century Code has only one sentence dealing with campus police departments and how they operate.

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They want state leaders to add a statute that deals with how officers are hired and let go, and how they can arrange agreements with other jurisdictions that let them do police work off campus on a routine basis.

Related Topics: CRIMEPOLICE
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