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NDSU grad dies of avalanche injuries

A North Dakota State University graduate buried in an avalanche earlier this month has died. Luke Oldenburg died Monday morning at the Medical Center of the Rockies in Loveland, Colo., according to Alex Stuessie, a hospital spokesman. He died fro...

Luke Oldenburg

A North Dakota State University graduate buried in an avalanche earlier this month has died.

Luke Oldenburg died Monday morning at the Medical Center of the Rockies in Loveland, Colo., according to Alex Stuessie, a hospital spokesman.

He died from injuries suffered in a Colorado avalanche, according to his obituary at www.allnutt.com .

Oldenburg, 31, was with two friends on Dec. 2 in an area known as Hotdog Bowl near Cameron Pass, Colo., when an avalanche struck, burying him under snow for about 10 minutes.

His friends dug him out of the snow and brought him down to emergency personnel who airlifted him to a Medical Center of the Rockies.

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Oldenburg never regained consciousness at the scene, according to Mike Fink, public information officer for Larimer County (Colo.) Search and Rescue.

He was put on a ventilator at the hospital, according to postings from friends on a message board at www.powderbuzz.com , but remained comatose, The Coloradoan newspaper reported.

Oldenburg was living in Fort Collins, Colo., at the time of his death where he had worked as a landscape architect since he graduated in 1999, according to his obituary.

The Rochester, Minn., native loved the outdoors and "lived life to the fullest," his family wrote in his obituary.

NDSU grad dies of avalanche injuries Forum staff reports 20071212

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