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NDSU students to hold forum on out-migration

There will be a forum presented by North Dakota State University students from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Thursday in the Century Theatre of the Memorial Union on the NDSU campus.

There will be a forum presented by North Dakota State University students from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Thursday in the Century Theatre of the Memorial Union on the NDSU campus.

The "Saving North Dakota" series, which ran in The Forum last winter, initiated a semester-long analysis of the issues, with a focus on solutions by a small group of honors students. It will be led by Deanna Sellnow, associate professor of communications.

The students conducted research throughout the state and across the nation to learn what is most likely to help North Dakota grow.

The symposium focuses on ideas from the students' perspectives. This approach addresses the state's desire to retain its young college graduates.

Many of the ideas the students will share focus on growing business and industry in ways that will create opportunities to employ more of North Dakota's college graduates.

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They also will talk about ways to bolster immigrant populations by learning what has worked for successful states such as Wisconsin and Iowa.

Another focus will look at what the state has to offer in terms of resources such as wind energy, agriculture, and manufacturing.

Finally, the students will talk about countering negative stereotypes with positive campaigns in the fields of advertising and tourism.

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