Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

New form of meth targets youths

A new form of meth aimed at children and teens is making its way across the country and is known to be available in Minnesota. "Strawberry quick" is the newest form of meth in the United States, said Rodney Hair, executive director of the Rural C...

A new form of meth aimed at children and teens is making its way across the country and is known to be available in Minnesota.

"Strawberry quick" is the newest form of meth in the United States, said Rodney Hair, executive director of the Rural Crime and Justice Center in Minot, N.D.

The flavored drug resembles rock candy and can be eaten, snorted, smoked or injected. Other reported flavors are chocolate, cherry, orange and peanut butter.

Drug dealers are using the flavored meth as a new marketing tool to get people hooked on the drug, Hair said.

Officials believe dealers are trying to attract younger populations who may think the drug is safer in a candy-like form or who may unknowingly take it.

ADVERTISEMENT

Hair encourages parents to know what their kids are doing and to do further research on strawberry meth. He advises teenagers to be aware the drug is out there.

Keeping the public aware of the dangers of meth and new developments is part of the work at the Rural Crime and Justice Center, Hair told the Commission on Alternatives to Incarceration on Wednesday in Fargo.

The commission was established during the 2005 Legislature and includes legislators, state officials and law enforcement officials.

Its goal is to study sentencing alternatives, mandatory sentences, treatment options, the expanded use of problem-solving courts, home monitoring and other related issues.

The commission also heard Wednesday from Cass County Jail Administrator Glenn Ellingsberg, who is chairman of the Jail Intervention Coordinating Committee.

The goal of the committee is to see what can be done to reduce the number of mentally ill people who are incarcerated, Ellingsberg said.

The Cass County Jail has had up to 34 percent of its population on some sort of psychotropic medication due to mental-health issues, he said.

Ellingsberg told the commission that his group received a $249,973 grant from the Department of Justice this fall to begin planning and implementing their project.

ADVERTISEMENT

One goal is to increase opportunities for early intervention by implementing enhanced screening tools and expanded training for jail and law enforcement personnel.

Another goal is to hire a new jail employee to identify the mentally ill and coordinate alternatives to incarceration with the court and attorneys, Ellingsberg said.

"I am confident that we can show that our project will have an impact on jail populations, as well as reducing the number sentenced to the Department of Corrections," he said.

The Commission on Alternatives to Incarceration will continue its research in the coming year. The group plans to have further meetings in Belcourt, Jamestown and Bismarck.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Teri Finneman at (701) 241-5560

New form of meth targets youths Teri Finneman 20071122

What To Read Next
The Buffalo Bills safety who suffered a cardiac arrest on Monday Night Football in January is urging people to learn how to save lives the way his was saved.
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
A Sanford doctor says moderate cold exposure could be the boost people need for their day.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.