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Police nab man wanted by FBI

A Florida man wanted by the FBI was arrested by Fargo police Friday morning after seeking medical attention inside the Salvation Army. Charles Andrew Devries, 56, was apprehended without incident after being treated by a doctor at a Family Health...

A Florida man wanted by the FBI was arrested by Fargo police Friday morning after seeking medical attention inside the Salvation Army.

Charles Andrew Devries, 56, was apprehended without incident after being treated by a doctor at a Family HealthCare Clinic office inside the Salvation Army Chapel and Community Center, 304 Roberts St. N.

Devries, whose last known address was Churches United for the Homeless in Moorhead, was wanted by the FBI for unlawful flight to avoid prosecution in connection with several charges he faces in at least two Florida cities.

The most recent charges come from the Pensacola area, where he is accused of burglary, grand theft auto, grand theft of firearms and being a convicted felon in possession of firearms.

Rick Powers, an investigator with the Escambia County Sheriff's Office in Pensacola, Fla., said Devries' recent charges there are related to his brief employment with an elderly disabled man.

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Devries is accused of burglarizing his employer's residence, stealing four guns and a vehicle from the man April 20, Powers said.

Devries, whose left arm is missing below the elbow, has a criminal record dating back to 1966, Powers said.

Devries appeared before Judge John C. Irby Friday afternoon in Cass County District Court in Fargo.

He requested an extradition hearing, which was set for May 31.

Irby set bail at $1,000 cash or bond. Devries remained in the Cass County Jail late Friday.

According to East Central District Court records, Devries was sought in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., for grand theft auto and grand theft. In that Nov. 18, 1999, case, Devries is accused of taking a car that was reported missing by his niece, Stacey Teddy of Fort Lauderdale.

Teddy told authorities that Devries took her daughter to school that day and never returned with the car. She later got an answering machine message from Devries saying, "I'm going to drive your car in the ground. I'm tired of working on it."

She also told police Devries took an $8,000 cashier's check given to her by a client of her cleaning business.

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Powers said Friday he had been tracking Devries for about two weeks. With help from an informant, he notified employees of the Family HealthCare Clinic Friday that Devries was inside their office and wanted by the FBI.

Fargo police were notified and quickly surrounded the facility. Devries was arrested by two plainclothes officers in a hallway outside the doctor's office.

Debra Quantrille, a fellow resident at Churches United, said Devries had been at the shelter a few days. They had eaten breakfast together and shared some small talk Friday morning.

"He said he came from down south, but he didn't talk a whole lot," she said. "To me, he seemed very sweet and harmless. He always had something nice to say."

Police have not recovered the vehicle and guns Devries is accused of stealing from the disabled Pensacola man.

The vehicle is described as a 1994 silver Plymouth minivan with side wood paneling and Florida license plate AO7TWI. The guns -- a .38 caliber revolver, a .22 Ruger pistol, a 30-30-caliber rifle, a Winchester shotgun -- and 300 rounds of ammunition are believed to be inside the van.

Readers can reach Forum reporters Matthew Von Pinnon at (701) 241-5528 or mvonpinnon@forumcomm.com , Tom Pantera at (701) 241-5541 or tpantera@forumcomm.com , Jeff Zent at (701) 241-5526 or jzent@forumcomm.com

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