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Police release blood-alcohol level for student killed by train

Preliminary autopsy findings indicate Adam Bertek had a blood-alcohol level of .197 when he was struck and killed by a train early Sunday morning, Moorhead Police Chief David Ebinger said this morning.

Preliminary autopsy findings indicate Adam Bertek had a blood-alcohol level of .197 when he was struck and killed by a train early Sunday morning, Moorhead Police Chief David Ebinger said this morning.

"That is a very high blood-alcohol content," Ebinger said, stating that if he had that much to drink "I wouldn't be able to stand up."

Ebinger said the findings raise questions about whether any businesses violated terms of their liquor license by serving someone who showed clear signs of being intoxicated.

Bertek, a 21-year-old Concordia College student, was killed moments after running out of Mick's Office, a bar in downtown Moorhead, but Ebinger said the investigation will focus on more than one business because Bertek had been to other bars Saturday night.

"We're going to look at all aspects of this," Ebinger said.

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Read more details in Wednesday's Forum.

I'm a reporter and a photographer and sometimes I create videos to go with my stories.

I graduated from Minnesota State University Moorhead and in my time with The Forum I have covered a number of beats, from cops and courts to business and education.

I've also written about UFOs, ghosts, dinosaur bones and the planet Pluto.

You may reach me by phone at 701-241-5555, or by email at dolson@forumcomm.com
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