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Power fully restored after downtown Fargo outage

FARGO - A power outage caused some stoplights to go dark and lights to flicker in downtown Fargo on Sunday, but most homes didn't lose power for long.An Xcel Energy outage map listed more than 2,200 customers affected around 12:30 p.m. Sunday, Ma...

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A stoplight stands dark in downtown Fargo after a power outage on Sunday, May 1, 2016. This stoplight is at Fifth Street North and First Avenue. Rick Abbott / The Forum
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FARGO - A power outage caused some stoplights to go dark and lights to flicker in downtown Fargo on Sunday, but most homes didn’t lose power for long.

An Xcel Energy outage map listed more than 2,200 customers affected around 12:30 p.m. Sunday, May 1, but those customers likely didn’t lose power for long, if at all, said Mark Nisbet, Xcel Energy principal manager in North Dakota.

Power was back on by 1:49 p.m., Nisbet said.

Stoplights were dark at a few downtown intersections, at First Avenue North and Fifth Street, at NP Avenue and Fifth Street North, and at First Avenue North and Second Street.

Those lights were back on by 1:45 p.m.

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“I don’t think it’s the start of a major problem, but we are diving in” to fix the problem, Nisbet said. “We want to make sure we’re understanding what’s going on before we make some bold pronouncement.”

Two incidents in south Fargo caused nearly 4,000 customers to go dark on Tuesday, April 26. A pole fire and downed power lines were to blame.

Nisbet said the Sunday outage could have been caused by a tree branch falling on a line or contact by an animal, but he didn’t have the exact cause yet.

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