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Privacy referral sides report income sources

BISMARCK, N.D. -- Protect Our Privacy, the group seeking to throw out the 2001 bank privacy law in the June 11 primary, has reported it raised $2,360 in campaign donations from eight donors.

BISMARCK, N.D. -- Protect Our Privacy, the group seeking to throw out the 2001 bank privacy law in the June 11 primary, has reported it raised $2,360 in campaign donations from eight donors.

Its opponents, Citizens for North Dakota's Future, has reported raising more than $112,000, including a $25,000 donation from Community First National Bank and $20,000 from Wells Fargo Bank.

Th group also reported many donations as small as $5 and $2 that appear to be from bank employees around the state. It has 266 total donors.

Rep. Bob Martinson, R-Bismarck, co-chairman of Citizens for North Dakota's Future, said it makes sense for the processing center banks to make those large contributions.

"It's extremely important to those processing centers that we have a 'yes' vote so of course they're going to contribute to the campaign," he said.

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His group has two out-of- state donors, one from Virginia for $50 and one from Arizona for $50.

Protect Our Privacy's largest donor is the North Dakota Farmers Union, $1,000. It has one out-of-state donor, the Transportation Political Education League of Cleveland, Ohio, for $200.

The reports were due Thursday, according to a state law governing reporting before a state primary.

The issue is Measure 2 on the primary ballot. A yes vote means approval of the law passed in the 2001 Legislature. A no vote means a rejection of the law.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Janell Cole at (701) 224-0830

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