Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Radio station in Jamestown gets boost with tower

JAMESTOWN, N.D. - A local radio station will get a big boost in the next month that will allow it to reach up to 45,000 more listeners, said Rick Pfeiffer, vice president and general manager of KSJB-AM/KSJZ-FM radio.

New tower will nearly double height
Jarrett Stevens, operations manager of KSJB-AM/KSJZ-FM radio, leans on tower components recently that will become part of the new 500-foot tower, which will nearly double the height of the one in the background. John M. Steiner / The Jamestown Sun

JAMESTOWN, N.D. - A local radio station will get a big boost in the next month that will allow it to reach up to 45,000 more listeners, said Rick Pfeiffer, vice president and general manager of KSJB-AM/KSJZ-FM radio.

The addition of a new 500-foot tower about five miles south of town will increase the station's broadcast area into Valley City, Carrington and Edgeley, Pfeiffer said.

A new transmitter will also increase the station from 50,000 watts to 100,000 watts of broadcasting power, which will result in improved sound, he said.

"Even to a casual listener, it should be a discernibly better audio quality," Pfeiffer said.

The wattage increase will allow people working in steel buildings as far away as Valley City to pick up a signal, he said. It will also modernize the way the current signal is broadcast, he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Currently the music would come from the station as a coded signal through underground data lines for five miles until it reaches the antenna.

The signal is decoded by a transmitter and broadcasted out to listeners, said Jarrett Stevens, operations manager and program director of KSJB-AM/KSJZ-FM radio.

With the data lines, or high-speed phone lines, the signal could be cut off if someone cuts the line or if melting waters short out pieces of equipment in the system, which happened this spring, Stevens said.

KISS 93.3 KSJZ-FM will soon send its signal via a studio transmitter link, a piece of equipment that sends the signal wirelessly from the roof of its office at the Buffalo Mall to a receiver on the tower, where it will be digitally decoded and broadcast, he said.

"We're hoping to have it up and operating, depending on the weather, by the end of October," Stevens said.

On the other dial, KSJB-AM is already a broadcasting powerhouse with the 18th largest signal area in the U.S., Pfeiffer said. KSJB-AM can be heard across 29,000 square miles and reaches out to Winnipeg.

AM signals go farther because they can bounce between the ground and atmosphere while FM signals can only be broadcast straight out, he said.

Stevens said he has an AM listener base in Thief River Falls, Minn., which is more than 200 miles away.

ADVERTISEMENT

"The other long-term goal is to start taking the FM seriously and Jarrett threatened to quit if we didn't," Pfeiffer said.

KSJB-AM/KSJZ-FM's competitors already use studio transmitter links and this equipment upgrade will greatly improve the FM station, Pfeiffer said.

But putting up a 500-foot tower isn't an overnight process.

Building it required permission from parent company Chesterman Company, FCC approval, a soil test, a Native American artifact study and permission from the Woodbury Township, Pfeiffer said. The entire process took about two years, he said. It also will cost more than $500,000.

The new technology will bring up the KISS 39.3 KSJZ-FM up to par with its competitors, Pfeiffer said.

The Jamestown Sun and The Forum are both owned by Forum Communications Co.

Related Topics: JAMESTOWNRADIO
What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Columnist Carol Bradley Bursack explains the differences between Alzheimer's, dementia and other common forms of dementia.
While the United States government gave help to businesses and people, a lack of assistance has left some Chinese citizens angry and destitute.
Having these procedures available closer to home will make a big difference for many in the region.