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Romney likely to win Clay caucus

Mitt Romney appeared victorious in Clay County Tuesday night as he captured 33 percent of the vote, according to county chairman David Hallman. Ron Paul won 26 percent, with Huckabee and McCain closely following. In all, 602 people cast ballots i...

Mitt Romney appeared victorious in Clay County Tuesday night as he captured 33 percent of the vote, according to county chairman David Hallman.

Ron Paul won 26 percent, with Huckabee and McCain closely following. In all, 602 people cast ballots in Republican caucuses in Clay County in complete but unofficial results.

"My heart is really warm tonight," said Morrie Lanning, R-Moorhead. "This is about as good of attendance at a Republican caucus that I have ever seen in our community."

Bridget King slapped a Ron Paul bumper sticker onto her top hat Tuesday night, her pink hair slightly sticking out.

"I've never been into politics so when I heard about (Paul's) radical idea of change for America, I got interested," King said. "He has very good ideas. I have faith in him."

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King was one of the many who came out in droves Tuesday to Moorhead's Horizon Middle School, all voicing their opinion on who they thought should be the Republican presidential candidate. Letters were read at the beginning of the caucus from several hopefuls, including one from Paul.

"Hearing the crowd cheer after that and seeing the signs flash, that felt pretty good," King said.

Kerin Hanson, 20, said it was her first time at the caucus, but she was proud to come out and support Mike Huckabee.

"He'll be good in office," she said. "I like what he stands for."

Lynn Carlson planned on voting for Mitt Romney.

"Romney really has taken a look at the issues and has decided these are things that really need to be fought for," Carlson said.

Phyllis Onsgard admitted that she was still undecided.

"It's down to Romney or John McCain, she said. "I'm going to hear what they have to offer," she said.

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For the frantic energy at the middle school, Onsgard said she relishes the excited feeling on caucus night.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Kim Winnegge at (701) 241-5524

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